When the New World Produces Classics

The Napa Valley does not have, nor will it ever have, as long and rich a history as the great wine houses of Europe. In my mind, though, the finest wines being made in the Napa Valley are as prized as those of its finest European brethren.

To make the very best wine one can possibly make takes relentless vigilance for detail.  It would seem that to do anything at a high level requires a refined skill borne of practice and passion and is by its very nature labor intensive hence, expensive.  Whether it’s in art or industry, if one wants to enjoy the very best, then logically there will be cost involved. A work of art that is truly handmade is the result of countless hours of dedication, of being on point at all times, of never letting ones guard down—be it in the studio, atelier or cellar.

To experience art that is palatable and experiential is why wine is in a category by itself. It informs us, and we in turn find a way back to its source: the devoted artist in collaboration with the natural world.

I am inspired by winemakers who are dedicated to these principles and consider them to be true artists. What they produce creates order from chaos. Within each vintage, they capture living history, through the prism of terroir and their own approach to elevage, and the results are rare works of art.

As a collector of art I seek pieces which I find deeply original and beautiful. To own a rare and finely-wrought work of art can be an exquisite and uplifting experience. As a civilization, we are now at a place in our collective history where the finest wines of Napa are themselves considered classic – works of art – that one can obtain, often for a fraction of the cost of a highly prized Bordeaux.

To experience art that is palatable and experiential is why wine is in a category by itself. It informs us, and we in turn find a way back to its source: the devoted artist in collaboration with the natural world.